Posts with #stories tag

Published on May 29 2015

Neil of Soundstatues: "How on earth could I get my music heard?"

In today's exciting digital music era, artists not only handle their own production, but also their own distribution, promotion, etc. The basically have to figure it all out by themselves and make their own decisions. In our very first guest post, Neil S. Matharoo, aka Soundstatues, looks back on taking the DIY road and experimenting to try to "make it".

 

 

By Neil S. Matharoo

 

It’s a great time to be a musician.

 

With modern technology, anyone can compose, record, and release music—with zero interference from shady, cigar-chomping businessmen.

 

There is a downside to this wonderful new world, however: everyone is composing, recording, and releasing music.

 

And how is a musician supposed to find an audience when there are millions of competing voices? Traditionally, this is where record labels stepped in (at the cost of owning the musicians’ work).

 

Neil S. Matharoo, aka Soundstatues
Neil S. Matharoo, aka Soundstatues

But now, record labels have been weakened to the point of irrelevance (unless you’re talking about manufactured pop music). So, the independent musician is on his own when it comes to getting his music heard.

And there’s another major problem: how can a musician earn money from his music? Every person deserves to be paid fairly for his work, even if his work is of a creative nature.

I myself was grappling with these difficult issues recently. I knew I’d written music which would resonate with many people, but I’m just a guy living in an apartment in Brooklyn. How on earth could I get my music heard?

I tried everything. I spammed social media, posted on message boards, emailed every label and agency I could find. Along the way, I found a site called Jamendo, which looked interesting. I quickly uploaded the song "Give It Up" and moved on.

A few weeks later, I reviewed the results of my promotion campaign. It was pretty dismal: nothing had worked. Most music-hosting sites turned out to be musicians just spamming each other for inflated stats.

 

But then I remembered this Jamendo thing, and I logged in to check my stats. I was expecting another failure.

I couldn’t believe it: Thousands of plays. Thousands of downloads.

I couldn’t believe it: Thousands of plays. Thousands of downloads. Fighting down my initial excitement, I assumed it was a fluke. But each day, I checked my updated stats, and there were thousands and thousands of plays and downloads.

 

Over the next few months, I periodically uploaded more of my music onto Jamendo, and two more of my songs ("Admire" and "In the Face of Injustice") got played and downloaded tens of thousands of times.

 

Jamendo is one of the very few places on the web where independent artists can be heard fairly. And if the music is good, then an audience will be found. All it takes is a few minutes to create an artist profile and upload your songs.

Here’s where it gets good, though. Because Jamendo has an actual, authentic user base (and not just musicians spamming each other), popular music will spread out of Jamendo. To my surprise, many people use my music from Jamendo as the backing audio to their personal videos on YouTube. And because Jamendo notifies its users that the music is part of the Creative Commons domain, proper credit is given to the musician in these videos.

 

Now, don’t get me wrong: it’s a real treat to see that a soccer team in Poland used my music in their video. But there’s a hidden bonus: YouTube pays me streaming royalties from these videos.

Neil of Soundstatues: "How on earth could I get my music heard?"

Jamendo has been the keystone of my music promotion. It has resulted in far more exposure than any other site I’ve used!

This leads me to my next point: Jamendo can indirectly help you earn money from your music. Yes, Jamendo offers music for free download. But as I tracked my huge increase in plays on Jamendo, I saw a parallel increase in revenue from services like Spotify, Deezer, and iTunes.

 

And with this hugely increased exposure came podcast and blog coverage, which resulted in even more paid streams from other avenues. I’ve even been contacted by various music industry professionals thanks to my success on Jamendo (I’m still independent though; I’m waiting for the right deal).

 

Jamendo has been the keystone of my music promotion. It has resulted in far more exposure than any other site I’ve used, which has had a ripple effect in other areas of my promotion strategies. I strongly suggest all independent musicians try it.

 

Just don’t spam each other for inflated stats, because that ruins the experience for the listeners! If your music is good, it will find an audience on Jamendo.

 

Neil of Soundstatues: "How on earth could I get my music heard?"

Published on January 15 2014

A Tribute To Jamendo World Music Artists

 

Jamendo artists come from many different countries and cover a wide range of genres. Today, we decided to focus on the music that lets culture shine through : The complaint of a spanish guitar through a Flamenco piece, the deep sounds of a Arabic flute through the dunes of sand, the chanson of an accordion somewhere in Paris, the catchy melodies of Celtic violins in the green plains of Ireland,  the traditional sonorities of ethnic instruments in Longji mountains.... We captured this unique sounds through a special playlist as a tribute to Jamendo world music artists !

 

 

Published on December 13 2013

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Sherbrooke, Québec. Five friends. A jazz background. A unique cocktail of unexpected electronic sounds mixed with disco accents and hip hop beats... Misteur Valaire has been gathering crowds online and on stage since 2004 : with nearly 35 000 fans on Facebook and 8K+ Twitter followers, and a big tour including an incredible performance in front of more than 100,000 people at Montreal Jazz Festival, the canadian band has been widely acclaimed by the public and the critic for their singularity of sounds and their high level of originality. French magazine Les Inrocks wrote that its members are "ready to conquer the world stages" and we couldn't agree more. The band was already nominated and awarded at the Independent Music Awards, ADISQ, Juno and GAMIQ. 

 

  Christmas has come early this year! After three successful albums (Brian (2005), Friterday Night (2007) and Golden Bombay (2010)), the band is now releasing their fourth album on Jamendo through an exclusive Creative Commons version available for free legal download ! This opus, entitled "Bellevue", is defined by the band as a "journey through space and time, a kind of funky party between 1930 and 2090, from Québec to Hawai, a night at the opera mixed with a rap battle and a fishing trip". Misteur Valaire showcases great creativity and mastery of electronic sounds, uses vocals as a instrument and never ceases to impress to create a memorable moment of jazzy electro-rock madness !

 

 

Download "Bellevue" on Jamendo !

 

 

 

Written by The Jamendo Team

Published on #News, #Stories

Published on November 5 2013

Stephane TV : "None of us had instrument lessons"

 

Stephane TV is one of these DIY rock bands that you know will succeed : Constantly seeking innovation in their music by playing with textures and genres, the italian band released a set of three EPs on Jamendo that will have you convinced. The original members came from various musical backgrounds : Heavy metal for Giuseppe and Claudio, Techno music that he played in rave parties for William (along with a passion for Soul, Blues and Brit-pop), HC for Giovanni, and Sludge-stoner music for Cosimo.

 

They eventually grew up founding themselves in love with post-rock and decided to put together a band who had the instrumental beauty of post-rock ridings and the vocal charm of american and english pop-rock hits. The Swedish Band Logh became their main influence. When Cosimo left the band, they welcomed Alessandro Emmi who also added his own personal touch to the band’s music.

 

 

 

 

The result is a talented cocktail of soft guitar solos, poetry in the lyrics, very beautiful male vocals and rock beats : A soothing but powerful music for the heart and soul. The tree Eps of StephaneTV are radically different and that’s what creates the beauty of it all. One thing is certain : You will hear more and more about these guys in the future, they seem to have a promising one !

 

 

If the band struggled at the beginning with two guitarists abandonning the project (Rocco whose garage music and influences as well as Gibson guitar parts can be found in the very first release; and Cosimo who contributed to the second and third EPs), they managed to build a new confidence after they found Alessandro Emmi, their current guitarist, and decided to write new songs and release those long forgotten takes left on hold on a hard drive.

 

 

William went back to the studio for mixing, the band found a newborn label and, since there were two different souls in the album, decided to go for a double EP inspired by the music of The National, Radiohead (II ep), Palace and Owen (III ep). The band now has new influences and is working on a new project scheduled for this winter.
Stephane TV : "None of us had instrument lessons"Stephane TV : "None of us had instrument lessons"Stephane TV : "None of us had instrument lessons"

 

William went back to the studio for mixing, the band found a newborn label and, since there were two different souls in the album, decided to go for a double EP inspired by the music of The National, Radiohead (II ep), Palace and Owen (III ep). The band now has new influences and is working on a new project scheduled for this winter.

 

As for the songwriting process, they told Jamendo : "We have two different approaches when composing: things can start up with a jam session or one of us shows up one morning with a new idea ad exposes it to the band. Both ways pass through evaluation from all members, a lot of evaluation, sometimes too much. We are not instinctive on composing, we consider every possible structure of a song, we try it with hard guitars or shiny arpeggios, with complicated or simple drumming and so on… and then we mash up to find what we like best."

 

 

We're quite instinctive in playing our instruments: none of us has taken lessons on his instrument !

Stephane TV

 

 

Support the band on Facebook and download their music legally for free on Jamendo !

 

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Written by The Jamendo Team

Published on #Stories

Published on October 29 2013

Supercomputer : Fresh Dubstep from Spain

Heavy beats with mesmerizing "wow" sound effects, that's the sweet musical cocktail of Supercomputer, a dubstep project from Spain. Its creator, Xevi Collado accepted to tell us a little more about his influences, sources of inspiration and music making process.

 

Xevi Collado's influences are wide : The energy of Skrillex, Steve Aoki and Deadmau5, the melodies of The Postal Service, Madeon, Daft Punk or Atoms for Peace, and the Rock of Muse, Radiohead, Alt-J, and Biffy Clyro (being a rock musician himself). In his albums, the artist tried to combinate energetic verses with a melodic chorus. His music is quite melancholic but energetic with a little brushtrokes of dream pop since his inspiration comes from human emotions like sadness, joy, anger, pain and the strange mix that they compose when brought together.

 

 

 

       

 

 

 

Supercomputer was born because he wanted to explore the relationship humans have with machines. After many hours spent searching for information about artificial intelligence, Xevi Collado found something about the apocalypse caused by robots. In this long text, he saw the word "Supercomputer" and said "That's what I want".


He mixed, mastered and produced in his studio. Being a member of two Rock bands, it was the first time he dared to do something electronic. Electronic and rock are not his only music styles, the artist's imagination has no boundaries.

 

Download Supercomputer's music legally for free on Jamendo and support the project on Facebook !